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‡Technology in development that represents ongoing research and development efforts. These technologies are not products and may never become products. Not for sale. Not cleared or approved by the US FDA or any other global regulator for commercial availability.
‡‡‡Gallium-68 PSMA is not approved by the US FDA and may not be available for clinical use in all markets.
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Scott Reeder, MD, PhD
Professor and Vice Chair (Research), Chief of MRI, Director, Liver Imaging Research Program, University of Wisconsin Madison

Imagining what’s next in MR

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Scott Reeder, MD, PhD
Professor and Vice Chair (Research), Chief of MRI, Director, Liver Imaging Research Program, University of Wisconsin Madison
As the 2020 Guest Editor, it is my honor and privilege to introduce to you the latest issue of SIGNA™ Pulse of MR. During this unprecedented time with the COVID-19 pandemic, I hope everyone in our global MR community is staying safe and healthy. As important, I want to thank our front-line healthcare heroes who are caring for coronavirus patients and remember those we’ve sadly lost to this terrible virus.
As with many imaging procedures, MR has been on pause as elective procedures are postponed. Once our countries slowly emerge from quarantines and sheltering, the need for MR will be great, as we address the backlog and help COVID-19 patients with any ongoing or new conditions that require the use of MR. More than ever, perhaps, advancing the "basics" of MR imaging technology with continued improvements in high performance systems including increased channel counts, improved gradient performance and fidelity, and advances in RF receive train technology has never been more important.
Continued advances in hardware performance are not only critical to ensure the best possible image quality, but are also an essential ingredient of quantitative imaging. Indeed, the transformation of MR from a qualitative to quantitative imaging modality continues to accelerate with both new and improved quantitative imaging biomarkers capable of detecting, staging and monitoring the treatment of a plethora of diseases. The highest possible accuracy, precision, and reproducibility, as well as standardization of quantitative imaging biomarkers is essential to ensure their clinical efficacy and impact.
One of these emerging quantitative imaging techniques involves our work here at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Diego Hernando, PhD, is leading our investigation into the use of IDEAL IQ for a fat-corrected liver iron measurement (see page 50).
As economic pressures continue to mount, the need for improved value in the delivery of clinical MR has never been more important. This doesn’t mean just accelerating MR scans but it also means ensuring consistent and efficient workflow, with robust imaging methods that avoid the need to repeat acquisitions.
AIR™ is a family of solutions designed to improve quality, workflow and the patient experience. Several articles from institutions throughout the world share their successes with AIR™ Coils, AIR x™, AIR Touch™, AIR™ Recon and AIR™ Recon DL‡‡.
Perhaps most exciting of the disruptions we are witnessing in medical imaging has been the introduction of artificial intelligence/machine learning. In this issue, we will see exciting new work using AIR™ Recon DL, an advanced deep-learning reconstruction technique for improving SNR and overall improved robustness in image quality. Further applications such as the use of machine learning for predictive analytics, adaptive scheduling and clinical decision support will certainly improve the delivery of care for our patients while ensuring appropriate use of advanced MR techniques. Throughout the field of Radiology, exciting new work in automated diagnosis and triage, automated data analysis such as segmentation, and automated reporting of quantitative imaging techniques are also emerging, with the help of artificial intelligence and machine learning.
Ultimately, it’s about bringing innovation and imagination together to improve the lives of the patients we serve. I hope you enjoy the articles contained in this issue of SIGNA™ Pulse of MR, describing state-of-the-art MR and novel applications that are sure to move the field forward. These include a glimpse into the potential for 3D MAGiC (page 53), as well as how diffusion tensor imaging can potentially broaden the use of a powerful imaging tool to help guide patient treatment in psychiatric disorders (page 57).
We also have several interesting patient cases from all over the world that explore the use of Zero TE in bone imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR in bony lesion detection, Gallium-68 PSMA‡‡‡ PET/MR, and black blood MDE and 2D/3D MDE for assessing myocardial infarction. I invite you to peruse this issue and explore the exciting work described in the following pages. Let your imagination wander through the future of MR, and together we can bring our vision to fruition for improved clinical care everywhere.
Reeder Signature.jpg
Scott Reeder, MD, PhD
Professor and Vice Chair (Research), Chief of MRI, Director, Liver Imaging Research Program, University of Wisconsin Madison
Scott Reeder, MD, PhD
Professor and Vice Chair (Research), Chief of MRI, Director, Liver Imaging Research Program, University of Wisconsin Madison